on photography

Category: On film photography (Page 2 of 6)

Learning Large Format

Having convinced myself that I would never get into Large Format (sheet film) photography, I finally talked myself into buying a 5×7 view camera with an additional 4×5 back. Such is life.

This new series of posts will describe how I get on with the new format for I will undoubtedly make mistakes. I don’t mind sharing these as I have no pretences to keep up and writing about them helps me to stay objective. After all making mistakes is the only way of learning anything.

In this first post I talk about the rationale for going into large format and the kit that I acquired.

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Paper Negatives: Investigation 1

I am enthralled by the pictures that Andrew Sanderson makes with paper negatives.

My last visit to his darkroom was spent wholly on paper negatives. So I am now experimenting with what I learnt, and where better to begin than at the beginning …

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Bookcase

Some comments on the technical film photography books that I have on my bookshelves … (click on relevant book)

[mbm_book_grid id=’5558′]


Standardising on film/developer

film developer combinations
What film/developer?

The general advice on choosing a film/developer combination is to select just one (or two) and to stick to this until you have learned its subtleties. The snag is that I enjoy experimenting, so I find sticking to this advice difficult. However, aside from some specialist techniques like infrared or pinhole, I seem to have settled on a few combinations that I favour …

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Split grade printing – again

I have written a few posts on split-grade printing before (here and here) but I thought that I would revisit it again in more detail. The reason for this is that I am having some problems with it, so a post like this forces me to re-evaluate what I am doing, starting with the basics and trying to understand where I am going wrong.

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Working the Landscape

Mention ‘landscape photography’ these days and many would immediately think of that style of photography that looks to the ‘beautiful’ or to the ‘sublime’ or to the ‘picturesque’ in our countryside. Perhaps we have Edmund Burke’s ‘A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful‘ to blame for that.

Romanticism in landscape photography is nothing new of course. 19th century Romantic photography provided a position which enabled a counter-reaction into Modernism.

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